Let’s Build

New Environment, New Approach

It’s Day 1, my first Microsoft Build, and I was not prepared for the sheer numbers nor format. I tediously worked out this schedule with sessions and back up sessions (in case, I don’t know… tripped on the way to the first one?). I lost my OCD mind when I realized these sessions were held open format in the MIDDLE OF THE EXPO!

I quickly realized the “sessions” were to show off their specialty. To draw you in by topic, touch on some “new” topics you hadn’t heard of, and get you to come talk to them. The presentation was not so much a sales pitch as it was a “let me help you develop on our platform.” Interesting……

My First Use of Vue + Bulma (Goodbye JQuery?)

The Hydra

I created a .Net Core site last month that despite meticulous detail to trying to keep my architecture tight, my database and API interaction and as clear as possible, I felt there was one large portion of my site needing attention: the front-end.

Being full stack often feels like wrestling a hydra. Just when I feel I’ve gotten the gnarly heads of database control, service interaction, dependencies under better control – there’s always at least one head loose, biting away at me. That currently, for me, is JQuery.

Your basic .NET Core application template contains the JQuery validation script, but it seems every feature I might want thereafter requires me to add a JQuery plugin. Animation? Add a plugin. Not to mention if I want responsive design, we’re looking at Bootstrap, which of course, requires JQuery. Javascript error? Good luck finding which plugin is at fault.

Done, so done with this. I need to improve my front-end game!

My Game Plan

Why Bulma

I’ve been hearing about this for awhile on dotnet hangouts and loved it’s easy to read naming conventions. It’s documentation is clean and it’s style resembled enough of …

PayTrace: 400 Bad Request For Declined Payment

TLDR:  post IS successful.  PayTrace, by design, returns a 400 error, which sets off exceptions in httpresponse.  Solution: catch the exception and then continue deserializing your response.

I coded a few weeks ago a .NET post to the PayTrace API which helps me demo and test payment by credit card using client side encryption.  The process more or less went like this:

  • Create demo account as a merchant on Paytrace
  • Download PEM key
  • On submit of form with credit card information, an imported PayTraceJS library encrypts the card number and csc code
  • Use the demo account’s username and password to submit a request for a token
  • Submit transaction (which includes encrypted info as well as other required fields) using token and await response

A successful http response returns a status code of 200.  I read it via stream, deserialize it using json into my CardResponse object (both successful and failure responses have the same design).  Everything went great until I began testing rejected cards.

Azure Blob’s Ghost Folders?

This week I had to address a upload image to blob application that I had built in my development environment, was working fine, but needed to be configured to work in production.  For the application overall, I used Azure Samples for Upload Image to Storage (built in .NET Core).  In it, the configuration in appsettings.json looks like this:

"AzureStorageConfig": {
    "AccountName": "",
    "AccountKey": "",
    "ImageContainer": "images",
    "ThumbnailContainer": "thumbnails"
}

 

Account Name account name and AccountKey are easily found in Azure Portal, for container I used Azure Storage Explorer just so I could get a full look at the container and its blobs.  The problem was, in my development environment I was uploading DIRECTLY to container.  In the example above, I was uploading to the “images” container.  In my Production environment, though, my ImagesContainer had two folders:  images/small and images/large.  I tried to change the “ImagesContainer”:”images” to “ImagesContainer”:”images/small”, “ImagesContainer”:”images\small” and no go.  Requested URI not found.…

She’s Already Coding

IT? 21 .. Am I Ready for IT?
When I entered the world of web development, my company had only experienced one other woman who tried to enter IT before me. Without experience, she had mostly taken courses in Computer Science but had not handled many computers herself. The result was that she appeared “book taught”. When it came to real-life situations, she was completely unprepared. So, the company was a bit weary of trying women in IT.

My Sketchy Background
I, on the other hand, had lived in an illustrious neighborhood where people came at all hours of night to sell or trade you things. For a minimal amount! I had an endless supply of “broken” computers to build my experience on.

Don’t get me wrong, I went to a great college and pursued all I thought I wanted to do. I somehow snuck basic HTML, C++, Java classes in on the side for my “science” pre-requisites. I mean, SCIENCE!

When I went back to my small town, jobs were scarce and I just needed A JOB, any job. The last position I applied for, the future CEO recognized I had taken computer classes. He asked about those classes,

Step By Step: Accepting Checks via Telecheck, Payeezy & Direct API (.NET)

This is a very basic tutorial on dealing with Payeezy, who’s documentation I found sometimes difficult.  Some of this guidance, I only found in forum threads and so I document…

Get What You Need

  1. Merchant Demo account
  2. Developer Sandbox account
  3. Merchant Token (demo)
  4. API secret (sandbox)
  5. API key (sandbox